Legal Note: Invalid Ballots

I tend to agree with commentor ‘cw’ – spoiled ballots will certainly be an issue. I spent a bit of time to dig up some background on this – if there are any lawyers out there do correct me if I’m wrong.

The law governing the election is the Senate and House Election Act of B.E. 2541 (พระราชบัญญัติประกอบรัฐธรรมนูญว่าด้วยการเลือกตั้งสมาชิกสภาผู้แทนราษฎรและสมาชิกวุฒิสภา พ.ศ. ๒๕๔๑). The pertinent section to the invalid ballots (บัตรเสีย) is section 70 paragraphs 3 which defines invalid ballots:

บัตรเลือกตั้งดังต่อไปนี้ให้ถือว่าเป็นบัตรเสีย
(๑) บัตรปลอม
(๒) บัตรที่มิได้ทำเครื่องหมายลงคะแนน
(๓) บัตรที่ไม่อาจทราบได้ว่าลงคะแนนให้กับผู้สมัครหรือพรรคการเมืองใด
(๔) บัตรที่มีลักษณะตามที่คณะกรรมการการเลือกตั้งประกาศกำหนด

The last definition gives leeway to the Election Commission to announce additional criteria for an invalid ballot. The EC made this announcement in 1999 (any later announcements?) pursuant to section 70 of the election law:

นอกจากบัตรเลือกตั้งที่ให้ถือว่าเป็นบัตรเสียตามมาตรา ๗๐ วรรคสาม (๑) (๒) และ (๓) แห่งพระราชบัญญัติประกอบรัฐธรรมนูญว่าด้วยการเลือกตั้งสมาชิกสภาผู้แทนราษฎรและ สมาชิกวุฒิสภา พ.ศ.๒๕๔๑ แล้ว ให้ถือว่าบัตรเลือกตั้งที่มีลักษณะดังต่อไปนี้เป็นบัตรเสียด้วย คือ
…………(๑) บัตรที่มิใช่บัตรซึ่งกรรมการประจำหน่วยเลือกตั้งนั้นมอบให้
…………(๒) บัตรที่ทำเครื่องหมายลงคะแนนให้กับผู้สมัครเกินกว่าหนึ่งคนหรือพรรคการเมืองเกิน กว่าหนึ่งพรรค
…………(๓) บัตรที่ทำเครื่องหมายลงคะแนนมากกว่าหนึ่งเครื่องหมาย
…………(๔) บัตรที่ทำเครื่องหมายอื่นนอกจากเครื่องหมายกากบาท
…………(๕) บัตรที่ทำเครื่องหมายลงคะแนนนอกช่อง “ทำเครื่องหมาย” หรือนอกช่อง “ไม่ลง คะแนน”
…………(๖) บัตรที่ทำเครื่องหมายลงคะแนนทั้งในช่อง “ทำเครื่องหมาย” และในช่อง “ไม่ลง คะแนน”
…………(๗) บัตรที่มีเครื่องสังเกต หรือข้อความอื่นใด นอกจากที่กำหนดไว้ในประกาศคณะ กรรมการการเลือกตั้ง เรื่อง หีบบัตรเลือกตั้งและบัตรเลือกตั้งสมาชิกสภาผู้แทนราษฎร

The typical spoiled ballot for this election, with writing and drawing on them, would likely run foul of at least one of the seven criteria above (“marks other than a cross” are forbidden as well as any markings outside the boxes).

The EC would very likely stand by this previous announcement, which leaves us with a court challenge. Anti-Thaksin opponents can probably petition the Constitutional Court to declare the EC rule unconstitutional as it potentially conflicts with section 104 and cite the clear intent of the voter to select the no-vote box.

4 responses to “Legal Note: Invalid Ballots

  1. An English translation is available of the Act you cite is available here.

    I think you also need to look at section 60 which states:

    “No person shall mark a sign as a remark by any means on the ballot paper.”

    Section 111 then states:
    ” Any person who violates section 59 paragraph two, section 60, section 61, section 62 or section 63 shall be liable to imprisonment of one to five years or to a fine of twenty thousand to one hundred thousand Baht or to both and the court shall order the disfranchisement for a period of five years.”

    It doesn’t specifically state that the ballot is invalid.

    The EC would very likely stand by this previous announcement, which leaves us with a court challenge. Anti-Thaksin opponents can probably petition the Constitutional Court to declare the EC rule unconstitutional as it potentially conflicts with section 104 and cite the clear intent of the voter to select the no-vote box.

    I am no expert on Thai law, but would do have some knowledge of the Constitution and Constitutional Court decisions.

    The Constitutional Court has held that under section 264 its power of review is limited to laws passed by bodies exercising legislative power and does not have the power to examine executive rules and regulations (4/2542, April 1, 1999).

    I understand that to seek review of the Election Commisson’s decision, the anti-Thaksin opponents* would need to apply to a court, the Administrative Court (?), to see whether the EC regulation is within the scope of power of the primary legislation (the Senate and House Election Act of B.E. 2541 Act). If it is not within the scope of the primary legislation then it is good news for the anti-Thaksin opponents. If it is within the scope of the primary legislation, then they could seek judicial review of the legislation to see whether it is contrary or inconsistent with the Constiution.

    Anti-Thaksin opponents cannot apply directly to the Constitutional Court (5/2541, August 4, 1997 in a 9-3 decision) to seek judicial review. They would need to apply to a lower court and if that court’s opinion a constitutional issue was raised then that court could refer the matter to the Constitutional Court -per s264 of the Constitution.

    *There is an issue of standing, but this is where my knowledge of Thai law ends.

  2. JW, Thanks for all the legal knowledge, really appreciate it. I guess this translates into the fact that any ruling from the courts will be too late to affect any outcome of the current political uncertainty.

  3. Naphat

    I am not so sure on whether it will be too late. It could take a very long time for the case to finally come to a conclusion and I am not really sure that the anti-Thaksin people will win. I am also not sure about the standing case. I guess we will find out.

    I have found the case now so can also point out that I should have pointed out that the Election Commission itself can also submit a request to the Constitutional Court for a ruling (No. 15/2541 19th November 1998 PDF of summary).

  4. Pingback: Global Voices Online » Blog Archive » Elections in Thailand·

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s